What makes animals susceptible to SARS-CoV-2? ...
nullDaily chartCorruption is getting worse in many poor countriesBut rich countries have problems tooMost of the world scores poorly in Transparency International’s annual corruption index. Using the assessments of business pundits and analysts, including figures from the World Bank and the World Economic Forum, the NGO scores countries from 0 to...
nullDaily chartThe IMF cuts its global growth forecast for 2022It blames Omicron, bunged-up supply chains and China’s property bustA lot can happen in three months. Since October, when the International Monetary Fund (IMF) published its last set of economic forecasts, known as the World Economic Outlook (WEO), a new variant of...
Insider tradingAllegations of insider trading in Washington spur new efforts to stop itA backlash against Capitol gainsATTENTION TO lawmakers’ finances is not new. What is surprisingly recent, however, is a ban on insider trading by Congress members. It was outlawed only in 2012, on the heels of the financial crisis, through...
Sequencing the future ...
The Intelligence“Day after day Russian diplomats are taking the off-ramps and dismantling them”—Ukraine tensions mountAlso on the daily podcast: Mexico’s hands-off pandemic response, and the merits and demerits of boozing at workMORE RUSSIAN troops piling in. Embassy staff pulling out. American forces on alert and sober diplomacy still on the docket....
The juntas and the huntedA coup in Burkina Faso will help the Sahel’s jihadistsMilitary rule will exacerbate the problems that have allowed extremism to thriveALL COUPS begin with confusion. In Burkina Faso the first sign was thunderous gunfire echoing out from army bases in Ouagadougou, the capital, on January 23rd. Mutinous...
Rewebbing the netWill web3 reinvent the internet business?In parts, yes. But probably not as sweepingly as its boosters reckonLIKE SEEMINGLY everyone these days, Moxie Marlinspike has created a non-fungible token (NFT). These digital chits use clever cryptography to prove, without the need for a central authenticator, that a buyer owns a...
Putin’s energy weaponHow will Europe cope if Russia cuts off its gas?Better than you might thinkEVERY FOUR years the European Network of Transmission System Operators for Gas is required to carry out a simulation of disaster scenarios. In the most recent such exercise last year the ENTSOG boffins mulled 20 shades...
The Economist explainsWhy do countries move their capital cities?Reasons vary, from the practical to the symbolic—but few moves are successfulON JANUARY 18th Indonesia announced that its new capital city will be named Nusantara (“archipelago” in Javanese). The country’s president, Joko Widodo, dismissed 80 other options before deciding on Nusantara. The project,...
What are the emerging technologies to watch in 2022? ...
Escaping ChurchillA new film offers a sympathetic portrait of Neville Chamberlain“Munich: The Edge of War” suggests the British statesman was not lily-livered but in fact overly confidentBased on Robert Harris’s novel of 2017, “Munich: The Edge of War” bravely takes on the job of trying to give Neville Chamberlain, one of...
The Intelligence“He’s come as close as he decently can to saying he’d like the job”—Mario Draghi and Italy’s presidencyAlso on the daily podcast: Africa’s damaging dependence on commodities and the rise of Native American cuisineTHIS WEEK’S secretive votes will determine the next president and the current prime minister looks to be...
Editor’s Picks: January 24th 2022Boris Johnson’s diminishment, the future of technology and vaccine mandatesA selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The EconomistA SELECTION of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the parable of Boris Johnson, and what...
Draghing Italy downMario Draghi’s bid to become president is bad for Italy and EuropeWhether he gets the job or not, it will disrupt a well-performing governmentSeldom has an election for the Italian presidency, a mostly ceremonial post, attracted as much interest as the one that begins on January 24th in Rome....
Too soon to relaxIn America, Omicron is spreading westwardLow vaccination rates and staff shortages could make a dire situation worseIN SOME PARTS of America, the Omicron variant appears to have peaked. Many states in the north-east and mid-Atlantic regions seem to have reached their highest point of covid-19 cases and hospitalisations...
Checks and BalanceWhy are so many liberals pessimistic about America?Our weekly podcast on democracy in AmericaJOE BIDEN voters are more likely to have a negative view of the United States than those who voted for Donald Trump, according to new research from The Economist. A year since his inauguration, is this...
Won’t you come on home?“Belfast” offers a jarringly comfy depiction of the TroublesThe characters in Sir Kenneth Branagh’s semi-autobiographical film seem oddly unaffected by sectarian violenceSir Kenneth Branagh launched his film-directing career with a gilded parade of ambitious Shakespeare productions, including “Henry V” and “Hamlet”, but for the past decade he...
Not a dry eye in the houseMeat Loaf was a unique and irresistible performerHis grand, histrionic style appealed to people looking for thrills in their own livesMeat Loaf, who has died aged 74, appeared so sui generis that it is tempting to place him in some private room in musical history....
Subscriber eventsThe new interventionism: business and the stateShould governments mind their own business?After decades in retreat the state is back in business. From growth in regulation to a renewed zeal for industrial policy, governments around the world are becoming bossier to the private sector. Sacha Nauta, The Economist’s executive editor, is...

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