Free exchangeA Latin American economic tragedyThe region’s latest woes fit a long-standing patternEditor’s note: Some of our covid-19 coverage is free for readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. For more stories and our pandemic tracker, see our coronavirus hubWHERE COVID-19 strikes, it reveals hard truths. In recent weeks Latin...
ButtonwoodWhy zero interest rates might lead to currency volatilityThere is little scope for them to adjust to economic trouble. So something else mustA GENERATION OF English cricket fans know the Aussies are loth to surrender a lead. For much of the past two decades, Australia has been a high...
SchumpeterHow Chesapeake Energy changed the worldIn times like these, business needs a bit of hubrisDRILLING FOR oil and gas is a contest of man and machine against nature. In America’s shale formations, nature takes the form of rocks, rich in hydrocarbons, buried about a mile (1.6 kilometres) below ground. It is...
BartlebyKeeping stakeholderism practicalThe rights and wrongs of management books on social issuesMODERN EXECUTIVES are often told they should worry about a lot more than their balance-sheets. They should be aware of their company’s environmental impact, of how well they treat their employees and suppliers, and whether their workforce is sufficiently diverse...
The house winsAmerica’s housing market is so far unfazed by recessionThe property market seems strangely oblivious to the economic carnage around itAMERICA’S HOUSING market is behaving oddly. Residential property—worth $35trn, slightly more than America’s stockmarket—seems strangely oblivious to the economic carnage around it. House prices in May were 4.3% higher than...
Xi sank your battleshipAs foreign banks circle, China plots an “aircraft-carrier” defenceThe government may let banks launch brokerages to fend off foreign maraudersCHINA PUT its first domestically built aircraft-carrier into service last December, the culmination of three decades of work. The government hopes for a faster return on efforts to create...
Collateral damageTrade finance stumbles into the digital eraCovid-19 forces the world’s most complicated paper chase to modernise“IN WARM WEATHER, fewer people wear socks,” says Paul Rotstein of Gold Medal International, a wholesaler in New York. People may not sport socks in the summer but his firm starts shipping them to retailers...
Banks and the crisisHow resilient are the banks?If today’s lenders were run like they were in 2008 they would be in huge troubleWHEN FINANCIERS and governments redesigned the financial system in order to make it safer after the debacle of 2007-09, most of them imagined that a shock as bad as...
The debt tollThe poorest countries may owe less to China than first thoughtStill, China lends more than the members of the Paris Club combinedTHE FOUR-LANE, 62-km toll road being built between Masiaka, a business hub in Sierra Leone, and Freetown, the country’s capital, promises shorter journey times, fewer accidents and smoother...
Droning onThe pandemic is giving unmanned deliveries a fillipDemand is surging for contactless provision of meals, medical supplies and other productsUNMANNED VEHICLES, airborne or earthbound, have been pressed into anti-pandemic service the world over. In Mexican slums they spray disinfectant from the sky. “Shout drones” with loudspeakers scold socially undistanced Americans,...
Seeking deliveranceFedEx tries to think beyond the pandemicLockdowns have been less of a bonanza for parcel-handlers than you might expectYOU WOULD have thought that lockdowns were a bonanza for courier services like FedEx. Not so much, it turns out. On June 30th the American pioneer of express delivery reported that operating...
Setting a new CORSIAAirlines blame covid-19 for rowing back climate commitmentsThe industry defangs an already mostly toothless carbon-offsetting scheme“THE WORST year in the history of aviation” is how the International Air Transport Association (IATA) describes 2020. The global airline-industry body expects carriers’ revenues to fall by half and debt to swell...
Appetite for destructionFood-delivery wars heat upWill winning the battle for locked-down Western stomachs ever translate into profits?JOSé AVILLEZ, a Portuguese chef, has picked up two Michelin stars for his inventive takes on traditional dishes such as a pudding that daringly combines chocolate ganache with cuttlefish ink. On June 29th he experimented...
GroupthinkIndia Inc’s inward turnForeign investors are rediscovering that the road to riches in India runs through powerful local partnersFACEBOOK WAS first to open its wallet. In April the social network said it would spend $5.7bn on a 9.9% stake in Jio Platforms, the digital arm of Reliance Industries, India’s biggest firm....

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